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Date:9/17/2014 1:38:14 AM
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Hi Tango sweetie pie
Good afternoon my dear BC friends, Zeena here with today's BOTM blog. We will once more make a stop in South American to visit one of natures very interesting and unique inhabitants. Our host is one of aviculture's beautiful, and unusual songbirds. The Green Oropendola. The Green Oropendola is of exclusively Amazonian distribution.The Green Oropendola (Psarocolius viridis) is generally common in its wooded habitats that are found in the Amazon and Guianas of South America; specifically Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. Largely pale green above, the posterior underparts and rump are chestnut, and the tail is largely yellow except for the central rectrices. The bill is green basally, becoming red towards the tip, and the skin around the eyes and lores is pink. Males and females are similar in plumage, but the latter sex is substantially smaller. Like most oropendolas, this species breeds in colonies, usually of five to ten pairs, and constructing a hanging ‘basket’ nest of woven plant fibers. The species’ displays are similar to those of the Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus).
Related common species include such song-birds as the Meadow Lark, Bobo-Link and Bullock's Oriole to name but a few.
The Green Oropendola eats a diet of fresh fruits, insects, mynah bird food and nectar in captivity. An active, high energy species these birds require a large, long flight to maintain them in good condition. Somewhat difficult to breed, these beautiful birds require an aviary suitable to house a number of mature pairs to have any success in nesting and rearing offspring. Hand reared babies of the Green Oropendola are occasionally available but do not tend to retain tameness once weaned. In the wild they typically nest in colonies similarly to Quaker Parrots, building their hanging basket-like nests in a common tree. Captive breeding is seeing an increase in successful clutches being raised to fledging and adulthood.
These are definitely not a species for the beginner avicultarist, and their pricy purchase costs in excess of $850.00US each leaves them to the more well off and experienced collectors. Their song is soft and melodious, a pleasure to listen to. Their call is often described as flute-like and low.
Tomorrow we will visit with a wonderful, entertaining species of bird, that once filled many living rooms, but today is rare both in captivity and their wild habitat.
I wish to thank all my many friends for their loving support on my quest to be August's BOTM. I couldn't make it without all of you.
love and scritches
Zeena 255116
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