BirdChannel.com Report Abuse

We want your experience on BirdChannel to be fun and safe. If you see any entries in the photo gallery or bird profiles that are offensive or obvious attempts at advertising, please submit the information below.

Date:10/1/2014 2:10:38 AM
* Your email address:   
Comment being reported:
Hi Tango
July 14th BOTM POST
Hello everybirdie, Zeena here to start of this week with a visit to one of the planet's wonders in the avian field. It was a special request from our dear friend Mr. Kiddo. We need to be very quiet as we visit these unique and highly endangered gems of the bird world. I wish to thank everyone for their votes and input.
The kakapo (Maori: kakapo, night parrot), also called owl parrot, is a species of large, flightless, nocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea found only in New Zealand. It has finely blotched yellow-green plumage, a distinct facial disc of sensory, vibrissa-like feathers, a large grey beak, short legs, large feet, and wings and a tail of relatively short length. A combination of traits make it unique among its kind; it is the world's only flightless parrot, the heaviest parrot, nocturnal, herbivorous, visibly sexually dimorphic in body size, has a low basal metabolic rate, no male parental care, and is the only parrot to have a polygynous breeding system. It is also possibly one of the world's longest-living birds. Its anatomy typifies the tendency of a bird's evolution on oceanic islands, with few predators and abundant food: a generally robust physique, quick movement efficiency at the expense of flight abilities & reduced wing muscles, . Like many other New Zealand bird species, the kakapo was historically important to the Maori, the indigenous people of New Zealand. It was hunted and used for both for its meat as a food source and for its feathers . It was also kept as a pet.
The Kakapo lays one to three eggs in a ground concave usually only raising one or two chicks per breeding season. The species is in a critically endangered position due to poaching, habitat distraction and the introduction of predators such as feral cats. Man's infringement on their breeding territory is causing a drastic and rapid decrease in numbers with only 6 chicks in 2012 surviving to maturity. A key part of the Recovery Plan is the supplementary feeding of females. The kakapo breeds only once every two to five years, when the Dacrydium cupressinum (rimu), produces protein-rich fruit and seeds. Observations of the relationship between intermittent breeding and the plant's mast year help biologists choose which suitable supplementary foods to increase kakapo breeding frequency. In 1989, six preferred foods (apples, sweet potatoes, almonds, Brazil nuts, sunflower seeds and walnuts) were supplied to 12 feeding stations. Males and females ate the supplied foods, and females nested on Little Barrier Island in the summers of 1989–91 for the first time since 1982, although nesting success was low. In March 2014, with the kakapo population having increased to 126, it sits on the verge of extinction. As man's awareness of their plight becomes known it is hoped that Conservation efforts will see a greater success in breeding these wonders of the Parrot World.
with love and scritches Zeena 255116
* Reason why this is being reported: 

Top Products
d
BirdChannel Home | Bird Breeders | Bird Species | Related Links | BirdChannel Editors and Contributors
DOGS | CATS | FISH | HORSE | REPTILE | SMALL ANIMALS | HOBBY FARMS
                       | Birds USA |  
Disclaimer: The posts and threads recorded in our message boards do not reflect the opinions of nor are endorsed by I-5 Publishing, LLC nor any of its employees. We are not responsible for the content of these posts and threads.
Copyright ©  I-5 Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved.
Our Privacy Policy has changed. Your California Privacy Right/Privacy Policy
Advertise With Us  |  SiteMap  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Use  |  Community Guidelines | Bird eClub Terms
BirdChannel Newsletter Signup | Link to Us | About Us | More Great I-5 Sites
Gold Standard

*Content generated by our loyal visitors, which includes comments and club postings, is free of constraints from our editors’ red pens, and therefore not governed by I-5 Publishing, LLC’s Gold Standard Quality Content, but instead allowed to follow the free form expression necessary for quick, inspired and spontaneous communication.

Become a fan of BirdChannel on Facebook Follow BirdChannel on Twitter
Get social and connect with BirdChannel.



Hi my name's SKITTLES

Visit the Photo Gallery to
cast your vote!
Information on over 200 critter species