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Date:9/20/2014 6:07:15 AM
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Hi Molly
Hello my dear BC friends. It was a long day without our beloved BC family but we are happy to say once it was up and going it was actually much faster then before. I had a special request from one of my friends to example the breeding of mutations. As this is a limited BOTM series I will touch on it briefly. For anyone interested in more in depth study I have a number of very good links and references.
In simplest terms a "mutation" is any deviation from the "normal wild-type" of any species of animal or bird. They occur spontaneously in the wild, as well as in captivity. In the wild MOST mutations have a very limited life-span owing to their coloration or other physical characteristics that make them more visible and easier prey. An example of a successful mutations are the red markings on normal Congo African Greys. These individuals integrate well into existing grey colored flocks.
In Captivity mutations are able to live and mature thereby offering breeders an opportunity to reproduce like marked/colored offspring. An excellent example is the Blue Budgie. These spontaneously occurred in several continents. By breeding Blue offspring back to normal parents the breeders were able to produce more of the same. Through selective culling and breeding of F2-second generation-blues the color was stabilized. Mutations can continue to occur even in a new mutation color--such as the blue Budgies who then produced offspring with yellow-Lutino or albino pigments. Inbreeding, selective crossing and out crosses to other colored mutations has given rise to all the many colors common in Budgies.
When looking specifically at Quaker Parrots, whose natural color is green/grey we find that the first mutation was a Blue baby hatched in Belgium in the 1940s. It is a complete replacement of the normal green plumage by blue. The gene for blue plumage is Autosomal Recessive and both hens and cocks can be heterozygous or ‘split’ for or‘carriers’ of blue – depending upon your favored terminology! This means--both parents must carry the gene to produce blue even though they are visually "normals" Today there are a large number of mutations being bred.
With all mutations, breeders must cull out the colors they do not want and breed the desired colors into the gene pool. Through consecutive generations of offspring the color is improved upon, often mutating from the original mutation thereby adding yet another new color for serious breeders to work with. Mutation possibilities are limitless as they occur spontaneously and can not be "created" by humans. Hybrids must not be confused with mutations. Hybrids are the result of breeding two diverse species within the same Genera together--examples of which are the Hybrid Macaws, Blue/Gold mated to a Green Wing etc.
Today we will visit a selection of mutations from a number of different species, I hope you enjoy the results.
with love and scritches Zeena 255116
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Hi my name's CHEYENNE & JEDI AND SNOWFLAKE & APACHE

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