Your E-mail:
Have you ever had to break up a fight between your pet birds?

BirdChannel.com Report Abuse

We want your experience on BirdChannel to be fun and safe. If you see any entries in the photo gallery or bird profiles that are offensive or obvious attempts at advertising, please submit the information below.

Date:9/21/2014 11:11:56 AM
* Your email address:   
Comment being reported:
Day 7 Waterin' holes or watering holes?
Howdy pardners, Cow Rangler Chuey here again, we spent considerable time today persuadin our Scout Kiddo off the Bar Stool at the waterin' hole he found. it took Jenny-lynn, some fancy ropin and a good cuttin' horse to get him back in the saddle. Miss Susan surprised us cow-punchers with a wonderful spread last night, given Lizzie and Kaji a much needed break.

The most famous "Trail Drives" during the early days of the American west, were from Texas north to the railheads in Kansas, and on to ranchers in more northern states.

They usually began in the spring, so that the cattle could feed on the new grass as they were herded along. For the northern ranges, the key element was to get to their destinations before an early winter came upon them. Also driving cattle driven in the spring, usually avoided the flooded rivers, so if a herd could leave at the right time, the streams and rivers would be shallow and fordable.

Starting too late could cause problems (including the loss of cattle) because the streams/rivers would be flooded from melted snow. The favorite speed was around 10 to 12 miles a day, although at different times, or under ideal conditions the herd might travel 18-24 miles per day. Generally a herd of steers moved faster, but a mixed herd that included cows and calves that moved slower, but was less likely to stampede.

In a trail drive, the cattle were "guided" and sort of drifted along rather than actually driven on an exact path. The drive started after breakfast, and went until time for the noonday meal (dinner) in which the Chuckwagon had gone ahead to pick a spot for the noonday meal. The Trail Scouts rode ahead to find a suitable night pasture.

A herd of around 3000 or so cattle would need somewhere between 12 to 15 drovers, and this included the Trail Boss, the cook, and the wrangler. Rank and/or status of the cowboy was determined by his place on the drive. The best positions were lead or point riders who "guided" the herd, the outriders on the flank were next, and the least favorite position was the "drag" riders who ate a lot of dust from the herd. At night two bird teams would take about two hour shifts, often singin' to the cattle to keep themselves awake. A term that was used for the shift was "Night Hawks" .
In the best of the trail outfits, each cowboy had between eight and 10 horses in a group of horses taken care of by the "wrangler" because the cowboys needed a good swimming horse, a good night horse etc. It was up to the Wrangler to know who each horse belonged to, and keep them together.

Well, times a flyin' and we gotta get these cows bedded down for the night at Bull-Run Creek.

Yipppeyiiiiahhhh cow dawgies

Trail Boss Chuey 245908
* Reason why this is being reported: 

Top Products
d
BirdChannel Home | Bird Breeders | Bird Species | Related Links | BirdChannel Editors and Contributors
DOGS | CATS | FISH | HORSE | REPTILE | SMALL ANIMALS | HOBBY FARMS
                       | Birds USA |  
Disclaimer: The posts and threads recorded in our message boards do not reflect the opinions of nor are endorsed by I-5 Publishing, LLC nor any of its employees. We are not responsible for the content of these posts and threads.
Copyright ©  I-5 Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved.
Our Privacy Policy has changed. Your California Privacy Right/Privacy Policy
Advertise With Us  |  SiteMap  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Use  |  Community Guidelines | Bird eClub Terms
BirdChannel Newsletter Signup | Link to Us | About Us | More Great I-5 Sites
Gold Standard

*Content generated by our loyal visitors, which includes comments and club postings, is free of constraints from our editors’ red pens, and therefore not governed by I-5 Publishing, LLC’s Gold Standard Quality Content, but instead allowed to follow the free form expression necessary for quick, inspired and spontaneous communication.

Become a fan of BirdChannel on Facebook Follow BirdChannel on Twitter
Get social and connect with BirdChannel.



Hi my name's Hi everybirdie, i'm back!!!!

Visit the Photo Gallery to
cast your vote!
Information on over 200 critter species