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Are You Ready To Adopt A Bird?

If you are looking to bring home a parrot from an adoption organization, answer these 3 questions to see if you are parrot prepared.

Jenny Drummey

Senegal parrot

Albert is a 10-year-old quaker parrot whose family is retiring and moving to a complex where pets are not allowed. He is friendly, healthy and is well-loved by his family.

Kiwi is a Senegal parrot whose family just had a baby, and they no longer have time to care for him. He is well-socialized and charming. Both of these parrots need new homes. Who can help?

Parrot adoption organizations can, and so can you.

Albert, Kiwi and others like them are placed for adoption every year. If you are new to birds, or if you are expanding your flock, consider the adoption option. Re-homed birds are no more difficult to care for than birds acquired through other means.

Working with a reputable adoption organization gives you access to a network of informed caregivers and dedicated volunteers. You also get flexibility. If the parrot doesn’t work in your home, many adoption organizations are willing to work with you to find a bird that does.

Some adoption organizations cover the initial expense of taking in a bird, such as cage costs and vet care.

But before you move forward, ask yourself these important questions:

The Parrot Preparedness Test
1) Do you have the space and time to properly quarantine another bird? If you have birds already, space for quarantine is crucial. No matter how you acquire your new companion, keep the parrot in quarantine for at least 30 days, and take the bird in for a well-bird exam with a qualified avian veterinarian.

While your new bird adjusts to your home it can be stressed, and this stress may lower its immune response. Proper quarantine methods require you to keep the bird in a separate airspace from your other birds, service its cage last, and thoroughly disinfect your clothing and shoes, and wash your hands after interacting with the new bird or cleaning its cage.

2) Do you have the time to devote to another bird? Carefully consider the amount of time any bird’s care requires. The time needed to properly care for a companion bird, such as meal preparations, routine cleaning and training sessions, as well as budgeting in time each day for direct and indirect attention, can have a big impact on your schedule. Not having time for a bird is one reason why parrots are relinquished in the first place. Also, keep in mind that if you have other parrots, bringing a new bird home will shorten the amount of time you can spend with them. 

3) Can you financially provide for a parrot for the long-term? There’s no such thing as a free bird. When you adopt a bird, the start-up costs are usually lower than acquiring through other means; however, bird foodbird toys and medical care are ongoing costs that can add up.

Once you’ve carefully thought out the impact a new bird can have on your life and that of your household and decided to move forward, contact a few parrot adoption organizations to see which one is a good fit for your needs and expectations.

Want to learn more?

3 Tips To Make Your Adopted Bird Feel Right At Home


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Are You Ready To Adopt A Bird?

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Reader Comments
hi there ! i want that bird which is in danger.... i will takecare of it and also breed them ..... so plz send me that precious bird.... although its cacatou or cocktail or any other but in pair.
Syedwasil, International
Posted: 6/19/2014 5:45:46 AM
Sir i want a parrot and also promiss to take care of it can you please help me as soon as possible.
mukesh, khambhat, GU
Posted: 4/18/2014 11:40:21 AM
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