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White-Bellied Caique from Houston, TX
Pico

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*~*~*~*~*~*~*

April 1, 2011 - PICO IS A GIRL.....LAYED AN EGG ~
April 4, 2011 - PICO LAID A SECOND EGG ~
April 8, 2011 - PICO LAID A THIRD EGG ~

***************- ***************- ***************- *****

One day I went to visit the bird store where I usually bought Skittles toys and saw Pico. I wasn't there to find a bird, just to get my "bird fix" since I lost Skittles. Anyway, he caught my attention, so I did what anyone would've done and asked if I could see him out of his cage. He was so sweet & full of kisses that something just tugged at my heart. I knew then I was ready for another bird ~ What a way to celebrate July 4th!
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Hi! My name is Pico

I am a White-Bellied Caique from Houston, TX.

Peex, P, PP & Pico Boo..... ..........

MY HATCH DAY: MARCH 6, 2007

JOINED BC: JUNE 27, 2007


8 years old   F

White-Bellied Caique

Yogurt Dips is one of my favorites! Another favorite is Nutriberries. My favorite fruit is black berries. My favorite veggies is corn & carrots. Another big favorite is a chicken wing bone. And, I also love the Golden Feast! That's yummy! What can I say.. I love to eat!!

My favorite hang out spot is with my mom whether it be on her shoulder or on top of her head! Next would be on my playground which is also fun.

Having to stay on on my playtop. ...would rather run around on the floor!

I love her because I know she loves me. She's always kissing on me, talking to me, & buying me new toys. She also lets me preen her hair!

Mom tells me I'm the messiest eater she's ever seen! I get food all over my beak, feet, and even my tummy sometimes. Another quirky & bad habit is that I climb down my cage & walk around like I own the place..

"Play like there's no tomorrow ~"


JULY 4, 2007 - ARRIVED AT MY NEW HOME

February 2, 2009 BIRD OF THE WEEK

March 19, 2010 BIRD OF THE DAY

September 2010 BIRD OF THE MONTH

June 28, 2011 BIRD OF THE DAY

June 30, 2012 BIRD OF THE DAY

June 14, 2013 BIRD OF THE DAY
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Bird Blog
DescriptionDate & TimeEditDelete
  Hi Poco & Pico
this is a continuation of birds intelligence from blog on 3-27. we messed up on the order.
Examples of bird intelligence include…
Carrion crows in Japan that deliberately place nuts in roadways, wait for cars to crush the nuts then retrieve the nut meats, all while coordinating around traffic lights to keep safe.
Woodpecker finches in the Galapagos Islands that trim sticks to the proper length for use as tools to forage for insects.
Green herons and other heron species that use bread fed to ducks or picnic leftovers as bait to attract fish for their hunting.
Blue tits in the 1920s that learned which color of milk caps on delivered milk had the most cream (whole milk) and pierced those caps to drink the cream.
Western scrub-jays that hold funerals for dead birds by making loud noises and avoiding the corpse, behavior that may be warning other birds of fatal threats.
Northern mockingbirds that recognize individuals who may be a threat to their nests and will attack only those individuals rather than attacking all passersby indiscriminately.
Aplomado falcons that hunt cooperatively in pairs and thereby increase their hunting success by a large margin through this teamwork.
Jays that cache hundreds of seeds and nuts in fall and manage to retrieve the majority of them over the course of the winter, exhibiting great recall for their hiding places.
Other well known examples of bird intelligence that could be attributed to instinct but still show at least some higher mental capability include:
Amazing nest architecture with intricate construction
Returning to the same ranges, even the same nests, for many years
Ability to navigate migration safely despite changing landmarks
Play behaviors, including taunting cats or playing with objects for entertainment
Recognizing who refills feeders and interacting with that person
Curiosity when responding to pishing or investigating new stimuli
Showing emotions through courtship, caring for nestlings, etc.
Some Are Smart, Some Are Stupid
Like any animal, not all birds are equally intelligent. Ornithologists generally agree that corvids (jays, ravens, crows, rooks, jackdaws, etc.) and parrots are among the smartest bird species and that social, gregarious birds often exhibit more intelligent behavior than solitary species. Still, every backyard birder has seen that one "stupid" bird at their feeders who just can't figure anything out, while another bird of the same species seems to be an Einstein in comparison. Watching birds and witnessing their intelligent behavior can be a joy for backyard birders, and learning more about bird intelligence in quantifiable ways is sure to keep ornithologists busy for decades to come.
THANKYOU FOR YOUR VOTE
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/30/2015 11:11.51 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco, from your pal Jenny
Today our dad is going to rearrange some of the clutter that has stacked up over the Winter, our home is starting to look like hoarders live here! Some times ya just got to take care of business! Life is good, live it to the fullest, and give our love to all in your happy home, see ya tomorrow...

Monday love from Jenny & our Dallas family

Come visit me, Ziggy~Happy Easter & thanks aunt Mary Haines, Jenny Lynn~Loving that warm sunshine..., Limon Dallas~Love my home & still see my old mom, The Raiders~Happy New Year from the team in 2014!!, Angel Christy~Happy Easter every birdie, Ms LaLo~Happy Easter dear friends... & Mr Flash~Summer at the McAviay.

03/30/2015 07:10.03 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
The Purpose of Play
All play that wild birds may use helps them develop necessary survival skills. Even adult birds may continue to play and refine their abilities, though not necessarily with the same frequency as juvenile birds play.
Manipulation play helps birds get more coordinated to build nests, capture prey or extract food from different sources. This type of play keeps bills and talons in good condition and builds up the necessary muscle strength and dexterity for intricate actions.
Investigation play teaches young birds about the world they inhabit, including edible and inedible foods and what objects are safe to touch. As birds investigate more, they refine their ability to cache objects and develop their senses.
Chasing play strengthens wing muscles and helps young birds develop greater agility in the air, or for terrestrial birds, strengthens their legs and helps them be more agile when running. This also helps carnivorous birds develop sharper hunting skills.
Taunting play sharpens a bird's reflexes and increases their agility. It also helps them learn to anticipate prey reactions or how to avoid predators, and will be useful for mobbing behaviors or defending their territory.
Balancing play strengthens foot and leg muscles and helps birds learn how to use their wings to counterbalance air currents or disruptions. Balancing can also be useful for different types of foraging or courtship displays.
Curiosity play teaches birds more about their world, expanding their knowledge of both threats and benefits and helping them react to the unexpected. Curious birds can be more adaptable and will be more successful when encountering changes in their habitat.
Mimicry behavior teaches young birds how to act like adults of their species and learn essential skills such as proper sounds and songs or how to use their unique bills or other physical attributes to the best effect.
While different play behaviors all have a purpose in helping birds survive, some birds do seem to play just for the sheer joy and fun of the activity. As with many types of bird behaviors, the exact purpose of all play is not yet understood, even by dedicated ornithologists, but birders can still enjoy watching the playful behavior of birds. Every time they see their feathered friends engage in another game, they learn just a bit more about birds even as the playing birds are learning more about their world.
THANKYOU FOR VOTING FOR MY BOTM CAMPAIGN
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/29/2015 10:58.47 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
Birds That Play
All birds engage in playful behaviors, and more intelligent bird species need greater amounts of the mental stimulation that comes from play as they develop. Bird species that can seem especially playful include…Jays, crows, rooks, ravens, magpies and other corvids,Parrots, parakeets, macaws and Keas,Tits, chickadees, nuthatches and small finches,Gulls, terns and related species.
Many social and adaptable birds also play, as do young birds of nearly all species as they socialize with their siblings in the nest. The extent of play and how much play each bird species carries into maturity varies, and different birds engage in different types of play to help them develop a range of skills.
Types of Bird Play
There are many different behaviors birds engage in that could appear to be play. The most common playful actions include…
Manipulation: Using the bill or talons to drop, toss, bend, tear, rip or otherwise manipulate objects, even objects without any food value.
Investigation: Seeking out unique objects or trying a wide range of different foods, continually noting new objects and poking or prodding them.
Chasing: Following one another in short or acrobatic flights, or chasing other objects such as insects or fluttering leaves.
Taunting: Teasing or deliberately harassing one another or other creatures, such as teasing a domestic cat or instigating fights.
Balancing: Swinging, swaying or dangling on wires or weak branches, possibly releasing and reattempting different acrobatic actions.
Curiosity: Responding to pishing or other unique noises, such as being attracted by ringtones, mechanical noises or music.
Mimicry: Imitating an adult's behavior, including physical actions such as foraging or preening as well as songs and sounds.
Not all playful birds will engage in the same behaviors, but they often try different actions and activities as they are learning new skills and refining their abilities. Play may be only between birds of the same species, while some types of play, particularly chasing or taunting, may be between birds of different species.
THANKYOU FOR SUPPORTING MY BOTM CAMPAIGN
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynh

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/28/2015 09:54.14 AM Report This Comment  
  Flitzer Saturday
Hello, Every Birdie
There will be a Memorial Celebration for Mario Adler Sunday afternoon at 1pm in the Castle Ballroom.

Please stop by Page #276082 Thank you.

--King Flitzer

Come visit me, Mario Adler Memorial Page & King Flitzer.

03/28/2015 03:46.21 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
Birds do a lot of activities that may seem smart, but how much of their behavior is instinct instead of intelligence? Ornithologists are continually studying birds and learning new information about their brains, how they think and why they behave why they do.

Deciding just how smart birds are depends on how intelligence is defined. Birds exhibit a wide range of intelligent behaviors, including good memories, extensive communication, planning for the future and remembering the past. Some birds can solve problems, and others have been observed playing – both activities that indicate more than just basic instinct. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines intelligence as:The ability to learn or understand or to deal with new or trying situations or the ability to apply knowledge to manipulate one's environment.
Do birds do this? Scientific studies indicate that yes, birds do learn, and every backyard birder knows birds are capable of adapting to new environments and conditions. Quantitative measurement of bird intelligence is difficult because birds cannot take intelligence tests or attend classes to be measured with their peers. Observations and studies of birds are revealing that birds may be far more intelligent than initially believed.
Bird Brain Structure
Brain size and structure is not an automatic gauge of intelligence, but it can be a clue. Birds may be small, but they have a proportionally large brain compared to their overall body and head sizes – in fact, bird's brains are similarly proportioned to primates. Studies of birds' brain anatomy also suggests that while the structure is different than that of mammals' brains, birds may have a higher degree of connectivity between the sections of their brains, which could indicate more intelligence and faster reasoning than previously believed.
Evidence of Bird Intelligence
The best indication of how smart birds are is direct observations of birds acting intelligently. While some observations have been made under scientifically controlled circumstances and through laboratory experiments, other observations have come from casual birders who notice their favorite birds behaving in peculiar ways, ways that seem planned and premeditated.
THANKYOU FOR SUPPORTING MY BOTM CAMPAIGN
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/27/2015 10:28.14 AM Report This Comment  
  Hey Pico Pot Pie!
I need your help buddy. I've asked King Flitzer if we could use the Castle grounds to hold a Celebration of Life in Little Mario Adlers name.

He says okay so I will need some help with the decorating.

Can you and your flock give us a wing?

I'm gonna be asking more friends for help in making this a nice memorial for Mario Adler, Dixie's lil frother.

Pookie bows and says the Castle Ballroom it is!

Can you help spread the word for us?

Mom only has her phone thingy and its a little slow at times.

I'd really appreciate all the help we can get.

Mario was a sweet sweet little guy and he will be sorely missed, especially by me and my flock.

I'll gather some friends and well decorate the ballroom.

Thank you so much again for all your help and for letting us use the Castle Ballroom.

We just hafta spread the word so that no one gets left out.

Sending big birdie hugs and a vote.

We want to hold it this coming Sunday.

Love,

Pookie, Laka Aolani and Angel Sallykins

Come visit me, Angel Sallykins, Pookie strutin' new Camo duds & Laka.

03/26/2015 12:50.58 PM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
Bald Eagles are nesting on all three of Pittsburgh's major rivers! Who knew the day would never come when Pittsburghers would be cheering for the Eagles…Bald Eagles, that is!

It has probably been more than 250 years since Bald Eagles last nested along Pittsburgh’s three rivers. In the 18th century, suitable nesting habitat in the form of mature tall trees was stripped from the hillsides flanking the rivers to meet the lumber and fuel demands of a rapidly growing human population in the area; second, industrialization beginning in the 19th century led to extensive unregulated pollution of the rivers, which decimated fish populations that eagles feed on; third, beginning in the mid-20th century eagles (and many other birds) showed signs of succumbing to the unintended side effects of widespread use of the pesticide DDT (developed for use in World War II) which eventually caused chronic nesting failure for the species. As recently as the mid-1980s, there were just a few remaining nesting Bald Eagles pairs anywhere in Pennsylvania, all of these in the northwest corner of the state.
One nest, located on the Monongahela River in the community of Hays is the most famous because a web camas been set up to view the nest. millions of people are viewing the nesting activity. Last year this pair successfully raised three eagle babies. this year they only layed 2 eggs. one of the eggs had a crack in it and the mom tried to keep it together but when the dad eagle came to sit on the egg he saw the crack and threw the egg out of the nest. during a recent snowstorm the mom eagle was totally covered in snow while incubating the single egg
The Bald Eagle,has made a tremendous comeback throughout its range in the lower 48 states. Its recovery is due to enforcement of federal laws protecting it from persecution, the banning of DDT, which bio-accumulated in eagles and other piscivorous (fish-eating) birds, eventually causing complete reproductive failure through the thinning of their egg shells to the point that eggs simply broke when parent birds tried to incubate them; passage in the same year of the federal Clean Water Act, and, direct recovery measures taken by our Game Commission, which brought nestling Bald Eagles from healthy populations to hacking sitese when the state’s breeding population was down to just a few nesting pairs. Similar efforts by game agencies in surrounding states also have contributed to the rapid increase in the number of nesting Bald Eagles in Pennsylvania. By 2000, there were about 50 known nesting pairs of eagles in the state; as of 2012, more than 200 nesting locations are known for Bald Eagle in Pennsylvania, including nests in almost every county!
thankyou for supporting my botm campaign
love BOO BOO the rare blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/26/2015 09:25.12 AM Report This Comment  
  Hello Pico!!
I'm flying in for a visit with you!! My frother, Pedro is in the kissing booth #163138. Miss BB started a story telling night and everyone is adding onto the story. Please stop in and visit with Pedro. He is a very good kisser!! Lol It's sure to be a fun night and I can't wait to see what you add onto the story. Visit with me soon.
Your friend,
Buddy

Come visit me, SUSAN, sooo Sweet!, ROCKET, thank you for BOTD!!, Zazu R.I.P. - Waiting at Rainbow Bridge <3, OOdles, The "finchey" bunch., PEDRO...the best kisser :-) & ~~BUDDY< The Budmeister!! ~~.

03/25/2015 09:36.31 PM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
HAPPY HUMPDAY
OBSERVING NESTS (PART2) from yesterday

7)Search carefully: It is critically important that we avoid damaging nest sites. Nests that have yet to be discovered are particularly vulnerable. When searching for nests, move slowly through dense foliage, being careful not to dislodge any nests. The nests of ground-nesting birds, such as Killdeer, Ovenbirds, Bobolinks, and many waterbirds, are difficult to see, so tread lightly and be cautious around potential ground-nest sites.
8)Be wary of nest predators: Avoid leaving tracks that can direct predators to nests. Nest predators are everywhere—on the ground, in vegetation, and in the air—and many are smart enough to watch you, so be careful that predators such as cats are not following you! Also try to not damage or trample vegetation that could expose nests.
9)Minimize disturbance at the nest: It is important not to startle a bird as you approach the nest; this may cause it to accidentally knock out eggs or young when it flies off. Before approaching the nest, try to see if a parent is sitting on it. Whenever possible, wait a few minutes to see if the bird leaves on its own. If they do, this is the ideal time to check the nest. If a sitting bird does not leave on its own, do not force it off the nest. In this case, you will need to come back later. Remember to keep each visit brief.
10)Never handle birds or eggs in the nest: Eggs can be easily cracked or small nestlings injured, and there is no reason to touch these fragile younglings, despite how cute they may look. Small nestlings are remarkably helpless and may not be able to crawl back into the nest cup if displaced, even inside of a nest box. Children observing nests should always be under the supervision of an adult.
11)Don’t leave a dead-end trail: If you plan on visiting the nest frequently, try to take a different route away from the nest site than the route you took to reach it. Walking to the nest and back along the same path leaves a dead-end trail that can lead predators directly to the nest.
THANKYOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT FOR MY BOTM CAMPAIGN
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/25/2015 10:25.54 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico, Poco, & aunt Cindy, from Jenny & flock
Very busy day for us, or at least for dad, but we want to wish you all a happy hump day! Please give our love to all in your sweet home, we'll see ya all tomorrow...

Forever love from Jenny & our Dallas family

Come visit me, Ziggy~Happy Easter & thanks aunt Mary Haines, Jenny Lynn~Loving that warm sunshine..., Limon Dallas~Love my home & still see my old mom, The Raiders~Happy New Year from the team in 2014!!, Angel Christy~Happy Easter every birdie, Ms LaLo~Happy Easter dear friends... & Mr Flash~Summer at the McAviay.

03/25/2015 06:03.18 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
RULES TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN OBSERVING NESTING BIRDS
OBSERVING NESTS (PART1)
1)Nest visits shouldn’t last much longer than 1 minute: Please exercise extreme caution and responsibility when searching for nests to ensure the safety of birds, nests, and nest contents; observations of nests should never jeopardize the well-being of birds!
2)Don’t check in the early morning: Most birds lay their eggs in the morning, so plan on visiting nests in the afternoon. Also, most adults will temporarily leave the nest when you are near, and eggs and young nestlings can become cold quickly if left alone in the morning.
3)Avoid nests during the first few days of incubation: If necessary, observe nests from a distance and approach only when the female leaves the nest.
4)Do not approach nests when young are close to fledging: When the young are disturbed during this stage, they may leave the nest prematurely. Young that fledge prematurely usually do not stay in the nest despite attempts to put them back, and their survival rates away from or outside the nest are low. So when young birds are fully feathered and very alert, only observe the nest from a distance.
5)Avoid nests during bad weather: If it is cold, damp, or rainy, postpone checking nests until another day. Checking nests during this time can be very stressful for birds.
6)Don’t check nests at or after dusk: Females may be returning to the nest for the night, and be alarmed by your presence. The exception to this would be owls, which typically leave the nest at dusk.
i hope you are finding these facts interesting
THANKYOU FOR SUPPORTING MY BOTM CAMPAIGN (i tired)
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/24/2015 10:51.25 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
It seems that birds may not be as faithful to their mates as we’ve been led to think.The use of DNA by scientists has provided new food for thought to people who had assumed that most birds were faithful to their mates, if not for a lifetime, at least for a single breeding season.

It turns out that there is more hanky-panky going on in the back fields and woodlands of the country among birds than anyone could imagine. DNA studies of songbirds have shown that among any four baby birds in a single nest, it is typical that only an average of two are the creation of the parent birds that are raising them. The other two nestling have either a different father or mother, or both. In other words, it is a common practice among songbirds to copulate with birds other than their mates, thus producing broods of nestlings with mixed parentage.

Not Every Partnership Lasts The Season
Divorce is also common among birds, particularly in birds of prey. If a mated pair of hawks, for example, is not successful in producing a brood of youngsters, an avian divorce often arises and one or the other will seek another mate.

Some birds that are faithful to their mates.Although there are a few exceptions, parrots are monogamous breeders which nest in cavities and hold no territories other than their nesting sites.The pair bonds of the parrots and cockatoos are strong and a pair remains close even during the non-breeding season, even if they join larger flocks. Eagles, some Owls Geese, Swans and some seabirds are uncommonly faithful, often for life. Indeed, true love does seem to exist in the bird world, though it is hard to find.

THANKYOU FOR VOTING FOR MY BOTM CAMPAIGN
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynh

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/23/2015 03:45.58 PM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
HELPING BIRDS WITH NESTS
NESTBOXES

‘Cavity-nesting birds’ like different boxes to nest in, depending on their size. You can build nestboxes for birds as different as owls, bluebirds, certain ducks, kestrels, and other species! Another great citizen science project at the Lab of Ornithology, NestWatch, works very closely with nesting birds, and has fantastic tips and learning aids about nestboxes, among other things. Here are some helpful links from the NestWatch program regarding nestboxes:

Nestbox plans: Be sure to check out the sections on protecting from predators and dealing with invasive competitors.


Features of a good nestbox: If you do decide to use kits instead of building boxes yourselves, please make sure that they are good for birds. You’ll want to make sure they have proper ventilation, no perches by the entrance hole (they often help predators access the nest), a sloped roof, drainage holes, thick walls, and a tight-fitting roof that does not permit water to enter the box.

TOMORROW more on watching nesting birds

THANKYOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT IN MY BOTM CAMPIGN

love Boo Boo the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/22/2015 11:36.51 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
HELPING NESTING BIRDS WITH FOOD

The plants in your neighborhood can be a big help to nesting birds! Grasses and weeds might be used to build the nest, and having varied habitat in your yard or local park is really important for birds to be able to nest and reproduce successfully, since some birds like to build in bushes, some in small trees, some near the water, some on the ground, some in tall trees, and so on.
Many plants and flowers provide fruit that birds use to feed themselves and their babies. Cedar Waxwings, for example, nest much later in the summer than other birds because they like to eat fruit, and it is more likely that fruit will be ripe later in summer.

All birds need water, both to drink and to keep themselves clean. If you put a birdbath, or even a small shallow container of water, out in your yard, you will probably attract birds! Keep it clean and provide some small stones for them to perch on so they don’t get into deep water.
When female birds are laying eggs, they need more calcium to create strong shells that will protect their young. What’s the best source of calcium? Broken-up eggshells from the eggs in your refrigerator work just fine! After rinsing any yolk residue out of the shells, crush them in a tray and see if the birds come pick them up and carry them away. Some birds use clay or grit to obtain their calcium from their natural environment. Birds also like to collect feathers to line their nests, so you can start a collection of feathers you’ve found outdoors and put them all out one day to watch them get carried away for re-use!
THANKYOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT FOR MY BOTM CAMPAIGN
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/21/2015 11:08.55 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
FIRST DAY OF SPRING: its snowing at our house
A sure signs that spring is on the way is the return of the migratory birds. : One morning, the bushes and trees around you are suddenly filled with singing birds that were not there just the day before. They have arrived during the night, following a combination of celestial (by the stars) and magnetic cues that are part of their genetic heritage.
These birds may have flown thousands of miles to reach your yard, after spending the North American winter in Mexico, Central America, or South America, where the days remain warm and food is plentiful during our cold season.Many of the birds we consider "our birds," in north america, actually spend less than half of their lives here. They move north as the snow melts and raise young on the plentiful supplies of insects that are abundant only during the long warm days of our late spring and summer. At the end of the breeding season, usually in late summer or fall, they move south again, most of them following only their instincts to reach the traditional "winter" home of their species.

The spring migration, for each species is a specific, optimal time when the birds need to arrive in their breeding areas. The strongest males arrive first and stake out the prime territories, often in the same location where they nested the previous year. When females arrive, they select the males that occupy the best habitats for raising young. The pair must then construct a nest, incubate eggs, and raise their brood in the short period before it is time to start the journey back to the wintering range.

In the last 20 years, many species are arriving earlier, and a significant number of species are also shifting farther to the north. Why? Scientists now believe that climate change caused by the buildup of greenhouse gases is disrupting the timing of migration and sending some species farther north in search of insects.
There has been an alarming decline in the populations of many migratory bird species. This is a result of several converging factors. Species that depend on unbroken forests in their North American breeding range are suffering because of forest fragmentation. The same species face additional threats south of the U.S. border, where logging and slash-and-burn agriculture are rapidly destroying thousands of acres of their habitats each day. Much research has focused on the lives these birds lead during their stay to the south , how they interact with nonmigratory resident species and how the habitat changes taking place in southern forests might affect the migrants.
THANKYOU FOR SUPPORTING MY BOTM CAMPAIGN
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/20/2015 11:32.22 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
What Can We Do to Save the Bees?
1) Garden Organically – Honeybees are very susceptible to pesticides and insecticides. In your own yard, choose organic means of pest control rather than toxic chemicals. Use companion planting techniques and disease-resistant seed varieties to reduce the need to spray more potent compounds in your garden or landscape.
2) Avoid Neonicotonoids that treat the seed before it’s planted. They essentially render the entire plant that grows out of that seed toxic to whatever insect feeds on it. Do not buy seeds treated with neonics, or plants that have been cultivated from them and encourage the garden centers not even to carry them.
3) Avoid Insecticidal Dusts – When bees collect pollen or nectar from a plant dusted with insecticide, they carry the insecticide back to the hive, where it can cause serious bee kills within the hive for many months. If you must apply insecticides, do so in the late evening or very early morning when fewer bees will be foraging, and when it is not windy.
4) Support Local Beekeepers who are on the front lines of keeping honey bees alive. Support their efforts to reduce pesticide spraying. The drift from the spray can infiltrate their beehives and kill off the bees.
5) Provide Water – Bees need lots of fresh, clean, unpolluted water to help them make their honey. Is there room in your yard or patio to add a small pond with a fountain or water filter to keep the water moving while providing lots to drink for the bees?
6) Urge the U.S. EPA to Test Pesticides That Could Be Causing Bees to Die Off
7) Plant A Variety of Blooming Plants – that bloom at different times of the spring summer and fall to provide a steady source of pollen. Native plants like purple coneflower (Echinacea) and Chokecherry can be ideal.
8) Encourage your neighbors to care for trees, flowers and bushes organically. Identify fields that your city or town can leave unmowed so that bees and other insects can feed on the pollen and nectar that will be available from weeds left to grow wild. Testify about the importance of protecting bees at your local city council or town hall meetings.
9) Buy Honey From Local Beekeepers –! You can find it online, at farmers markets and in natural and whole foods stores.
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Love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/19/2015 11:19.39 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico & Poco
Honeybees do more than make honey. 100 crop species which provide 90% of food worldwide are bee-pollinated. Almost every food you eat exists because bees pollinated the plant they came from. Honeybees populations are dying out in alarming numbers. Since 2006, 10 million beehives, worth an estimated $2 billion, have been lost .Scientists and beekeepers have several theories about why honeybees are dying off.
1) Bees live in colonies, with one queen and many drones and worker bees. During winter, the queen lays eggs within each cell inside a honeycomb. Fertilized eggs hatch into females that become the worker bees. Their job is to forage for food and take care of the colony. Unfertilized eggs become drones or honey bee males. For any colony to survive, the queen must lay fertilized eggs and those eggs must become worker bees. There is only one queen per colony. She mates once, but it counts when she does, as normally she collects more than 5 million sperm, enough so she can fertilize eggs throughout her life. When a queen can no longer lay eggs, new queens become responsible for mating and laying honey bee eggs. One theory behind the collapse of honeybee colonies is that the queen is not getting enough sperm from the male bee that she mates with. Another theory is that the queen is dying earlier than usual, which means she has less time to fertilize eggs. fewer fertilized eggs give rise to fewer worker bees that can help maintain the bee colony. If the queen dies out and is not replaced by a new queen, the hive will die out.
2) Many bee hives have been found to be infected by a tiny parasite called a varroa mite are wreaking havoc on bee colonies. The mites suck fluid from bees’ bodies, making the bees weak and compromising their immune systems. The mites also pass along viruses that can paralyze the bees. It is hard to kill off the mites without harming the bees
3)–, bees need food and water to survive. In their case, food comes from the pollen they collect from a variety of fruits, vegetables, and trees. They also need unpolluted water sources. Urban sprawl and industrial development are taking the place of fields that used to provide the plant variety that kept bees thriving. regions suffering from drought, annual flowers aren’t blooming and perennials aren’t producing as much nectar.
4)Neonicotonoids – is a systemic pesticide. It’s not sprayed on plants. Instead, seeds are treated with the chemical. As the plant grows, the pesticide infuses its plant tissue. If a bee nibbles on a plant grown from neonic-treated seed, it could be lethal.TOMORROW: HOW WE CAN HELP THE BEES
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love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

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03/18/2015 10:53.12 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico
HAPPY ST PADDYS DAY
if you wear, eat or drink anything green you will have good luck. anyone not wearing green must be pinched

four leaf clovers are lucky because they protect from witchcraft. if you cross poison ivy with a four leaf clover you will have a rash of good luck.

A bird stumbles up to the only other patron in a bar and asks if he could buy him a drink.
"Why of course," comes the reply.
The first bird asks: "Where are you from?"
"I'm from Ireland," replies the second bird.
The first bird responds: "You don't say, I'm from Ireland too! Let's have another round to Ireland."
"Of Course," replies the second bird.
Curious, the first bird then asks: "Where in Ireland are you from?"
"Dublin," comes the reply.
"I can't believe it," says the first bird.
"I'm from Dublin too! Let's have another drink to Dublin."
"Of course," replies the second .
Curiosity again strikes and the first bird asks:
"What school did you go to?"
"Saint Mary's," replies the second bird.
"I graduated in '62."
"This is unbelievable!" the first bird says.
"I went to Saint Mary's and I graduated in '62, too!"
About that time in comes one of the regulars and sits down at the bar. and asks "whats up"
"Nothing much," replies the bartender. "The O'Birdy twins are drunk again."

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love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/17/2015 09:21.46 AM Report This Comment  
  HI PICO
The Prairie Chicken is one of americas best dancers and their courtship performance is the sort nature documentaries love to feature.

Prairie chickens are native birds of North America. There are two kinds of prairie chicken, and both are chunky, brown, chicken-like prairie natives. The Greater Prairie-Chicken is the larger of the two varieties and has a broader range, encompassing eleven Midwestern and Plains states. Greater Prairie-Chickens prefer tallgrass prairies, Lesser Prairie-Chickens choose a shortgrass prairie habitat. Once rather widespread, Lesser Prairie-Chickens now exist only in northern Texas, western Oklahoma, southwestern Kansas, and southeastern Colorado.the Greater and Lesser have suffered catastrophic decline due to loss of habitat.

Prairie chickens are called arena birds because of the males tendencyto pick out a special area, or arena, in which to display for interested females. The male prairie chickens arrive at their arenas just before sunrise. The arenas, also called leks, look no different to humans than the rest of the prairie — that is, until a female or two glides or struts onto the scene, and the males start trying to impress.Bending forward and raising their tail feathers and the special dark feathers near their heads, the male prairie chickens then inflate the air sacs along their throats (orange in the Greater and pink or purplish in the Lesser). From these sacs the birds let out great booming calls, which resonate across the early morning prairie lands. “Ooo-loo-loo, ohh-loo-loo” echoes from all around as the suitors serenade females. Sounds is similar to an amplified sound of blowing across the top of an empty bottle. To top off the performance, the anxious males rapidly stamp the ground as they call, thus creating a strange song-and-dance routine.
It’s quite a site and puts most other courting rituals,to shame.
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03/16/2015 05:09.26 PM Report This Comment  
  Hello, Pico!!!
Golly, it's been a while, hasn't it? I hope you and yours have been healthy and happy! I wish I could say the same for all of us. We birdies have been doing mostly alright, but to be honest with everyone, mother has been hit hard with depression, which is why we've been so inactive and why we birdies haven't been getting as much attention as we used to. Mother's kept quiet about her condition with most people she knows, just to keep things as cheerful as possible. But I guess that's not how life works, is it? Everyone has their ups and downs. And that's normal, natural and actually healthy. And mother shouldn't be ashamed anymore, so we hope everyone understands. So I sincerely am sorry about how my family and I seemingly disappeared off the face of the earth! It wasn't our intent, but that's how things go sometimes.

A lot has been going on in our lives. Mother quit her job because it was not a healthy environment. She had been sexually harassed by multiple people (though didn't tell the management about them all), and despite being one of the youngest people in her department, was pushed to her limits with the load of work she was given. It was all far too much, so she left. That was back in early January. She still hasn't applied anywhere else, but is hoping to build her strength back up to be able to get a job again.

To be entirely truthful, we birdies haven't been getting the same attention as we used to. Mother's working hard to change that, but it's a work in progress.

All five of us now reside in the livingroom where we get much more interaction with people and each other. None of us are ever let out with another bird though. This room is massive, and has two entryways, which mother is hoping to buy removable curtains for so she can cover them up and let us out in here. I haven't gotten much mommy and me time for a while, but since it's my hatchday today, I got let out in the bathroom once again and got to share an apple with mother! Yummm!

You've all been in our prayers and thoughts, and once again, I'm sorry for appearing then disappearing as much as I have. We're working on a change (: Hopefully I'll be keeping you all updated. Much love, Spirit xx ♥

Come visit me, Daisy & Spirit ♥.

03/16/2015 08:38.14 AM Report This Comment  
  HI PICO
Beware the Ides of March.

Caesar, as he passed the soothsayer on his way to the senate chambers, mocked and called Spurinna a false prophet- for the Ides of March had come to pass and he remained unscathed. But the prophet warned that though it had indeed come, it had not passed. Then Caesar, entering the senate conclave, headlong into the hands of fate did violently perish.
****
The Kingbird's Omen

A king-bird flew in Pompey’s Hall
Pursued by others from the grove
With laurel sprig in hand it strove
To hard elude the brawl

But overcome by violence wide
It fell the victim of its foes
And as they there in triumph rose
On purple floors it died

These symbols in Spurinna stirred
And warnings out to Caesar went
But fruitless was the message sent
The omen went unheard

Then there he was near Pompey’s Hall
Pursued by fate and too by Jove
And as he toward the senate strove
There Caesar met his fall

For overcome by violence wide
He fell the victim of his foes
And as they there in triumph rose
On scarlet floors he died

thankyou for your support for my BOTM campaign
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/15/2015 10:27.25 AM Report This Comment  
  HI PICO
The Red-capped Manakin (Pipra mentalis), aka theRed-capped Manakin Moonwalking Bird is an amazing little bird. Its famous moonwalking behavior captured on film and an all-time favorite bird video.

Manakins are sparrow-sized birds that live in tropical forests in South and Central America. Males perform elaborate courtship displays to impress females. Included in its repertoire is Michael Jackson's moonwalk. Or does Michael Jackson do the manakin moonwalk? Maybe he stole it from the birds! Even people who aren't into birding are amazed by the "moonwalking bird". The film is just slowed-down videography caught on special high-speed cameras. This advanced camera can capture a few seconds of action at up to 1,000 frames per second. So what you are seeing in the video is not real-time. The high-speed film also helped to explain how the manakins made all the weird buzzes and other noises when displaying. It's produced not vocally, but rather by the vibration of their wing tips. They actually move faster than a hummingbird's wings!

Check out the videos on U-Tube. type in manakin doing moon walk or michael jackson dancing bird.
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love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/14/2015 12:47.40 PM Report This Comment  
  HI PICO
In honor of Friday the 13th, here are 13 bird superstitions

1. If a bird poops on your head it is a sign of good luck.
2. Don’t become a sailor if you kill an albatross, as superstition states you will get lost at sea (we just think you shouldn’t on principle).
3. It is good luck if a blackbird makes a nest on your house.
4. If you see 5 crows, sickness will follow; see 6 crows and death will follow.
5. To avoid bad luck tip your hat if you see a magpie.
6. Whatever you do to a robin will happen to you, so be nice!
7. It is bad luck to see an owl during the day.
8. A kingfisher is a very lucky bird.
9. Three seagulls flying together, directly overhead, are a warning of death soon to come.
10. Sparrows carry the souls of the dead, it’s unlucky to kill one (again, we think killing any birds is wrong).
11. When a swan lays its head and neck back over its body during the daytime it means a storm is coming.
12. Having a wren around will prevent one from drowning.
13. A bird that flies into a house foretells an important message. However, if the bird dies, or is white, this foretells death.

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love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/13/2015 09:12.26 AM Report This Comment  
  HI PICO
Why Does The Cold Cause Blackbirds To Gather In Large Flocks?
The old saying, “Birds of a feather flock together,” is particularly true among blackbirds in winter.

Though many birds band together during winter, none are as notorious for their flocking behavior as blackbirds, including.red-winged blackbirds, European starlings, common grackles and brown-headed cowbirds.This group of a feather often flock together in the many thousands, sometimes the millions. One winter roost in the Great Dismal Swamp on the Virginia-North Carolina border held an estimated 15 million birds. Flocks in the thousands often roost in urban and suburban areas, where their numbers and their noise make them unpopular among the people living nearby.

Many wonder why birds in general and blackbirds in particular gather in flocks in winter. It is generally believed that there is safety in numbers. With many more eyes and ears to search for food and watch for predators, the chance of an individual bird surviving winter is increased.

There are reports of hawks attacking flocks of flying birds time and again, but failing to capture even one when the prey closed ranks to form a mass that the hawk was unwilling or unable to penetrate without being injured.
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love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

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03/12/2015 05:20.52 PM Report This Comment  
  HI PICO AND POCO
SUBIRDIA: Suburbs are bustling with birds.
10 ways you can help birds and connect with nature.
1. Landowners can increase bird use of their turf by reducing its extent, mowing it less often, and skipping the fertilizers and pesticides. Providing shrubs and trees, especially native species, increases food resources. Thickets, brush piles, rocks, standing dead trees and logs contribute cover from predators and safe nest and roost sites.
2. Keep your cat indoors. Our favorite felines are called “house cats” for a reason. Free-ranging cats kill one in 10 wild birds. Plus, living inside extends the average cat’s life by a decade.
3. Make windows visible to birds.Collision is the second most deadly and preventable threat for urban birds. Obscuring just 5 percent of a large window with artistic etching, frosting or simple striping can help. Or use decals that reflect ultraviolet light, visible to birds but not humans.
4. Do not light the night sky. Use light only when necessary and from as dim a source as possible. Bright bluish light is the most disruptive, soft yellow the least. Face outside lighting downward, not skyward, and especially avoid illumination that shines horizontally.
5. Provide food, water and nest sites. Birds benefit from the provision of nest boxes and preserving dead trees or limbs is the best way to ensure a steady supply of cavities for the species that require them.
6. Do not kill native predators. Subirdia needs the natural checks and balances that predators such as hawks and owls provide. Exercise restraint when applying pesticides. The toxins we use to control insects and rodents are deadly to small birds and mammals.
7. Foster a diversity of habitats around backyard landscapes. Many native plants could be retained if we carved lots carefully from existing vegetation, rather than scraping entire lots bare and replanting them with a standard mix of nursery stock.
8. Make roads safer for wildlife. Creating crossings for reptiles, amphibians and mammals increases biological diversity, which is good for subirdia. Enable natural grasses and shrubs to fill in along road verges and medians, and limit roadside mowing of these sites during nesting season.
9. Ask local planning authorities to ensure functional lconnections between land and water including buffers along waterways, vegetated corridors, golf courses or a series of small parks strung together along an abandoned transportation route.
10. Enjoy and bond with nature where you live, work and play! city residents can suffer environmental amnesia and why it is important to conserve nature in urban settings.
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Love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

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03/11/2015 05:11.01 PM Report This Comment  
  HI PICO ND POCO
Falcons are more closely related to Parrots than they are to hawks and eagles.
1)Parrots: Plumage in bright, saturated colors. Social. Smart. Most species found in the tropics. Strong hooked bill used to tear apart fruits and nuts.
2)Falcons: Awesome predators. Superlative fliers. Plumage exclusively in earth tones. Relatively solitary. Found from the tropics to the Arctic. Strong hooked bill used to tear apart prey.
3)Hawks and eagles: Everything about falcons also applies to hawks and eagles. Hawks and eagles tend to soar as they watch for prey, while falcons tend to rely on speed for active pursuit of it.
Eagles hawk and falcons are aerial predators it has driven these birds to converge upon one another in solitary lifestyle, body size and shape and color of feathers in what is called convergent evolution and not family history.DNA codes nearly everything about the final form and behavior of an animal. The “complete sequence" of DNA found in an animal (or plant) is referred to as its genome..Through genomes, every living thing, represents one version of “the book of life.” some parts of the story are changing all the time corresponding to rapidly evolving genes, such as immune systems that must change all the time to respond to new threats. Other parts of the story have remained essentially unchanged for hundreds of millions of years. These parts correspond to highly conserved genes, which tend to govern basic life processes shared by all organisms.Compare one species’ story to other species’ versions, and patterns start to emerge and how they relate to one another. More closely related species share more of the story and have fewer discrepancies between versions.Analyses of the entire genome indicate that parrots and falcons shared many more years of evolutionary history They share passages of their stories uniquely with each other relative to all other birds except songbirds, Parrots and falcons shared an ancestral species whose DNA kept evolving l long after they split off from the lineage that led to the “other raptors,” hawks and eagles Parrots and falcons share an ancestral species proven by DNA and years of evolutionary
history
thankyou for your support and votes for my BOTM campaign
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/10/2015 05:15.31 PM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico
Glad you enjoyed your special day.My weekend was very nice but way to fast as usual. Finally warming up here getting a taste of spring and it sure is nice.Im certainly tired of winter and hope we have seen the last of it . Hope your week is off to a good start. Have a good night.

Come visit me, Hulk Vote Boo Boo(162724) BOTM.

03/09/2015 08:21.36 PM Report This Comment  
  HI PICO
I am aware that most of us already know this and especially Willies mom but after tomorrows blog you will understand why i have posted this.

Many scientists believe that the demise of the dinosaurs began when an asteroid struck the earth 66 million years ago, near what is now the Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.

In the nuclear winter-like conditions that followed, some dinosaurs survived, and among them were the early ancestors of birds. These gave rise to what's been called the Big Bang of bird evolution. Birds underwent an extraordinary diversification, over five to 10 million years.

Nearly 95% of the 10,000-plus bird species now flying, swimming, and walking on earth came out of this evolutionary moment.

Recently a huge international research team sequenced the full genomes of 45 birds of diverse lineages. The group used the unprecedented wealth of DNA data to rewrite avian genealogy. Their conclusions were published in December 2014.

One other finding from this prodigious data-crunching: the common ancestor of today’s birds – among them warblers, parrots, woodpeckers, falcons, and owls –T-Rex- was an “apex predator.” A top-of-the-food-chain carnivore.

So even a seed-eating cardinal has something like T. Rex in its family tree.

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love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

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03/09/2015 01:55.39 PM Report This Comment  
  Hi Peex
Great to see you here on BC! Well, mom didn't say anything about the bingo except that she was tired. Their table made over $1200! Mom doesn't know what they got from the gate yet, but that was a good day of work. Yesterday's tours at the museum was fun, there was the cutest little 4 year old on her first tour who had a ton of questions. That always makes the tour interesting.
Today mom called off at the wildlife center to go to the emergency room. Her ankle woke her up several times during the night, so she thought it was a good idea to get it checked out. It turns out that it is osteoarthritis, which mom suspected anyway. They wrapped it up with an Ace bandage, told her to take Tylenol for the pain, and sent her home with a referral to an orthopedic group. So, after she gets done with our blogs, she will put up her feet, call the orthopedic guy, and put ice on it.
Hope you are having a good day and getting lots of cuddles and scritches. It feels like spring here! Temps in the 40s and sunny today! Hugs, Falco

Come visit me, Gizmo, I miss you, sweet boy, Willie, Peppino, Divo & Falco.

03/09/2015 10:34.03 AM Report This Comment  
  Hey Pico !
It was great to see you around and about here on BC again ! We missed you :)We're starting to see some snow melting ! It was mid-30's yesterday and again today . . . 40's the rest of the week ! I was so happy with the sun shining (and mom even opened a window in the other room for a bit) that I took a bath ! It felt so good on my feathers ;)

Mom is having a harder time with the clocks changing than me and daddy. I just do what I want when I want - daddy too, since he's semi-retired. Mom is having to go to school and deal with all those sleep deprived 4th graders !

Have a super Monday ! love you ! Cookie

Come visit me, Cookie - Happy Easter, BC Library Now Open & Fly with the angels my Sally.

03/09/2015 01:52.25 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico
Glad you had a wonderful hatchday.
Hugs
Chyna

Come visit me, Derby Farms, Chyna & Bailey ♥ RIP.

03/08/2015 09:44.52 PM Report This Comment  
  Hey Pico!
Hey pretty girl! Glad to hear that you had a nice day!
Love,
Raffikki

Come visit me, Raffi , PumBaa & Max say Happy Easter!.

03/08/2015 09:22.24 PM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico
Mom says thanks for the birthday wishes!! Mom said the clocks were turned an hour ahead during the night. I can’t tell time so don’t pay any attention to the clocks. The sun and my body tells me about what I should be doing at certain times of the day. Mom is happy it was just the changing of the clocks in the house and not the calendars having to be turned too…think that happened one time too. Arizona never changes their time like we do and mom wishes our state was like that too. By the time mom gets used to this time it will be July LOL. “Roses are red, Violets are blue, Your house is blessed because a fid lives with you.” leaving a vote for you.~~your friend forever, Gus (RIP Chi chi)

Come visit me, Gus--Chi chi ♥ RIP & Chi chi RIP my sweet girl..

03/08/2015 07:22.25 PM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico
Greyt hearing from you, and Mom so understands about the time constraints.

Well, the warm weather continues here with a high of 78, and today it was warm without blustery winds so my sunbath was greyt. Luckily it wasn't too hot when I got outside, in spite of having to be coaxed and conned into my carrier (DST helped!). It was 1:30 by the time we made it, but the temp was just perfect. And Dad had mowed the lawn while Mom was at the gym in the morning, so I could tell there weren't any snakes in the grass. He claims that is the only reason he mows, but I don't think I believe him. Now it is supposed to get up to 82 tomorrow, so we will get out early.
Kiddo

Come visit me, BOTM CALENDAR PAGE, BOTM Founding Feathers, Wedding photos & Kiddo says vote 4 BooBoo #162724 for BOTM!.

03/08/2015 03:26.44 PM Report This Comment  
  Hi again sweet Ms Pico from Jenny & Christy
We are losing our deep snow cover very quickly, boo whoo, LOL! We have rarely ever looked forward to Spring like weather more than this year, but it is coming, ready or not, and we ARE ready! Angel Christy sends her usual Sunday love from Heaven, this shall always be her day! Have a great day dear BC friends & Angels, and give our love to all in your happy parrot hut, see ya tomorrow...

Eternal love from Jenny, Christy, & our Dallas family

Come visit me, Ziggy~Happy Easter & thanks aunt Mary Haines, Jenny Lynn~Loving that warm sunshine..., Limon Dallas~Love my home & still see my old mom, The Raiders~Happy New Year from the team in 2014!!, Angel Christy~Happy Easter every birdie, Ms LaLo~Happy Easter dear friends... & Mr Flash~Summer at the McAviay.

03/08/2015 12:49.56 PM Report This Comment  
  HI PICO
It’s a distressing but all to common sight on winter days at this time of the year to see hawks attacking and eating birds at bird feeders. The typical scenario is a flock of songbirds quietly eating at feeders, when all of a sudden, a hawk swoops in and panics the birds into flight. A hawk may capture one of the songbirds in its talons, and then fly to a nearby tree to eat its prey. hawks learn that even if they miss on the first pass, a bird may fly into a window in panic, and make an easy prey on the hawk’s second pass. Many people are shocked at the sight of a hawk eating a songbird.But it is all part of the balance of nature. Hawks have to eat, too, and a bird feeder is the perfect place to find their food. There are two species of hawks responsible for most of the predation on feeder birds: the Cooper’s hawk and the slightly smaller Sharp-shinned hawk. Both have long tails and short wings for pursuing small birds through trees and bushes.latitudes. All hawks are protected by state and federal laws, and cannot be harmed or harassed. the solution is to live with them, as we live with other bird feeder problems, such as fat squirrels

I always scream and warn mom and dad when i see a hawk

THANKYOU FOR SUPPORTING MY BOTM CAMPAIGN
love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/08/2015 11:48.09 AM Report This Comment  
  Hi Pico
It's a good thing I wished you a HAPPY HATCHDAY on FB. Cause, my power went out after that.
I saw your party pics ... so much fun.
Hugs
Chyna

Come visit me, Derby Farms, Chyna & Bailey ♥ RIP.

03/07/2015 08:37.43 PM Report This Comment  
  hi Pico
TONIGHT THE TIME SPRINGS FORWARD1 HOUR AND MANY OF US HAVE A HARD TIME ADJUSTING. The early bird catches the worm. Bright eyed and bushy tailed. Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.

We belong to a culture that prizes morningness and subtly chastises those who like to stay up late and sleep in. whether you’re chirping like a lark at dawn or hooting like an owl at midnight largely comes down to a matter of genetics.

We are more or less divided into morning (LARKS) and night (OWLS) people set by our genes
Our internal clock, circadian rhythm, is reset by light; but even though the dawning of light on the planet happens consistently, our individual clocks don’t run alike from person to person. Hence, larks and owls.If you have a fast clock you like to do things early, and if you have a slow clock you like to do things late.western society is based around daylight-centered productivity, which means night owls get the short end of the stick."Larks" strength tends to stay steady throughout the day – not just peak early – but night owls have peak performance during the evenings.

Which camp of birds do you fall into? REMEMBER "SPRING" YOUR TIME 1 HOUR AHEAD TONIGHT

I HAVE TO GO WAKE UP MOM NOW

thankyou for your support for my BOTM campaign

love BOO BOO the rare Blue Bali Mynah

Come visit me, Paddy Cake & Piddy Girl, CORI reigning champ on feed the birdie & BOO BOO VOTE BOO BOO BOTM 162724.

03/07/2015 02:56.01 PM Report This Comment  
  Heya, Miss Pico!
Stopping by with this very delicious and very large Hatchday cake made just for you by the lovely Lizzie herself! Plenty big for everyone of your flockily and friends to share in celebration on your special day! And it comes with big wishes for everything you could ever want and even more! Head scritches, treats, toys, and most important...lotsa love!

Happy Hatchday!
Kaji and Lizzie

where have you been??

Come visit me, Kaji ~ Vote Boo Boo #162724 for BOTM in April!.

03/06/2015 10:22.14 PM Report This Comment  
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